After regaining consciousness the next morning in Waikiki, we discover that this is what our hotel looks like during the day. At night, it was largly dark. In front of the hotel note the two parlm trees. Yes! Not one, but two palm trees. What's that? Yes, I know one is a little bent, still, plam trees!
After regaining consciousness the next morning in Waikiki, we discover that this is what our hotel looks like during the day. At night, it was largly dark. In front of the hotel note the two parlm trees. Yes! Not one, but two palm trees. What's that? Yes, I know one is a little bent, still, plam trees!
When you walk to the bathroom at night, the tile floor is not cold. It's not a heated floor, it's just Hawaii. When you turn on the faucet in the sink, the temperature of the water seems to be just about right. If you want hot water you will have to wait for it and if you want very cold water — I'm not too sure you can get it but I haven't had to try. I haven't needed any yet.

Five hours after we got to our hotel we awoke to the noise of a busy city at the Holiday Surf Hotel in Waikiki. We should have slept much longer but we are suffering from “positive jet lag” where you get up early and feel fine. We will pay for this when we return.

We checked out, locked our bags in the rental car and walked around Waikiki. Walking past a number of street hawkers targeting us as obvious tourist we drifted into the huge Outrigger Hotel where Duke's is located. This is an old restaurant offering a breakfast buffet where, aside from the usual breakfast fare, you can find mountains of fresh, local fruit. Just like in tropical paradise.

Duke's sits at the bottom of the hotel. It has some connection to Duke Kahanamoku and is decorated with posters and photos of the original surfing master. From your table you look out over the pool and through the palm trees right to the beach and the ocean waves. New York City, I hear, has 6 inches of snow predicted for today. I note that no one is talking about it.

From our breakfast table we can actually see these recreational activities taking place: sailing, surfing, ocean swimming, para-sailing, paddle boarding, helicopter sight-seeing, beach combing, sun bathing, pool swimming, picnicking, outdoor dining, ocean sport fishing, yachting and photography. We learn that later this week the ninth annual ukulele picnic will be held in Honolulu. We're going. Who can pass up a ukulele picnic?

Haleiwa and Waiaula, Hawaii

We drive to the other side of the island to the north shore to find the cottage we rented. You can't really say that it's the backwater of Oahu since the island doesn't seem to have real boondocks but it's on the opposite side of the island from Honolulu, in and amongst a lot of agriculture. It's also dead center of some kind of surfing Mecca. Here there's a community of transient, hard-core surfers that all look like movie stars but alas, spend whatever money they have on chasing waves.

The cottage is adorable. It's very modern and clean inside. Outside there is a shower and laundry machines because it's Hawaii and why not have your shower and laundry machines outside? I notice that none of the pipes are insulated. It's February but there are no snow shovels by the door. An occasional chicken pecks her way through the yard adding an easy country charm to the place.

Inside my wife darts about the cottage opening all of the windows to let in that fresh, warm, fragrant and perfectly moist Hawaiian air.